document

Fri
23
Jun
Dennis Faas's picture

Format Section: MS Word

A newsletter or article usually begins with a larger title or headline. To have a headline span the width of several columns in MS Word, it must be formatted with a different number of columns. Formatting Pages with Section Breaks Whenever you have ... different page-level formatting applied to a single document, you need to break it into different sections with something called a "section break." In doing so, sections of a document can be formatted with different margins, page orientation, number of columns, headers and footers, page numbering, et cetera. For example: in a newsletter ... (view more)

Wed
21
Jun
Dennis Faas's picture

Create and Use Newspaper Columns: MS Word

Although tables are used to present text that must remain in side-by-side columns, they would be clumsy to use when creating a newsletter. MS Word provides a different feature that lets you create "snaking" or newspaper-style columns, where the text ... flows down the page in a narrow column and then continues to the next column. To establish this multi-column format, you'd use the Columns button in Word. Newspaper-style columns are used whenever you have a lot of text to fit on a page, particularly a large page. If the pages were printed in long lines that ran the width of the page, ... (view more)

Wed
14
Jun
Dennis Faas's picture

Create and Modify Headers and Footers: MS Word

When you want the same text (such as a title) to appear on the top of every page, you are creating a header. On the other hand, text that appears on the bottom of every page is called a footer. Both headers and footers appear within the page margins ... and are unaffected by adding and deleting text in the document. You can set the measurement for headers and footers in the Margins tab of the Page Setup dialog box. Longer documents often must have certain text on every page, such as chapter titles, author names, dates, file names, or page numbers. You wouldn't want to have to type the text at the ... (view more)

Fri
09
Jun
Dennis Faas's picture

Insert Symbols: MS Word

In your documents, sometimes you have to include symbols other than the standard letters, numbers and characters that appear on the keyboard. MS Word has many interesting symbols for you to use: everyday items such as the degree symbol (98.6°),  ...Greek letters (ΦΒΚ or ψ), letters needed in foreign words (such as résumé or Senõr), and even cute little pictures (such as  and §). You must use these symbols when they're needed in the text, but the pictures, sometimes called "dingbats," can be used for decoration. To begin, click to the insertion point where you ...view more)

Fri
19
May
Dennis Faas's picture

Add a Table of Contents to Your Document: MS Word 2003

You've composed a very large, very informative document. And now you want to configure it so that your readers can navigate it easily using a Table of Contents (TOC). Defining Style To begin the process, you will first need to properly format your ... document with Styles. Highlight the document text that you want to show up as table of contents major sections. Next, depress CTRL-ALT-1. You can highlight more than one paragraph at a time by depressing your CTRL key (even if the paragraphs aren't in sequence). This will apply the Heading 1 style to your text. This text stands out from the rest and ... (view more)

Fri
05
May
Dennis Faas's picture

Reading Layout View: MS Word 2003

Many times I receive articles and documents via e-mail and I have resorted to printing them so that they were easier for me to read. In Word 2003, this task has been significantly enhanced with a new Reading Layout Mode, which provides handy single ... and multiple page layouts for reading and editing documents. If you are opening a document primarily to read it, reading layout view optimizes the reading experience. Reading Layout view hides all toolbars except for the Reading Layout and Reviewing toolbars. To switch on Reading Layout view, click the Read button on the Standard toolbar. The ... (view more)

Tue
04
Apr
Dennis Faas's picture

Find and Replace Special Character Symbols: MS Word

You're almost at the end of drafting your document when you realize that you used the registration symbol (®) throughout, instead of the copyright symbol (©). You would think you could simply go to Edit | Find and replace all instances of the ® sy ...mbol with the © symbol; unfortunately, it's not that easy. The problem is that when the Find And Replace dialog box is open, Word's menus and toolbars are unavailable, making it difficult to find and replace symbols in your document. And, you cannot use Insert | Symbol to enter the actual symbols in the Find What: text box. If a symbol has a shortcut ...ref="/news/1078/find-and-replace-special-character-symbols-ms-word" class="more-link">view more)

Tue
21
Feb
Dennis Faas's picture

Access Frequently Used Documents in a Jiffy: MS Word

If you have a few documents that you work on regularly, you can add the "Work Menu" to your Menu Bar. The Work Menu allows you to save a reference to your most frequently used documents for quick retrieval. Launch MS Word. From the Tools menu, ... choose Customize; then, click the Commands tab. From the Categories heading, scroll down and select Built-In Menus. From the Commands heading, drag the Work menu to the Menu bar (next to Help near the very top-right of the screen). Close the Customize dialog box. Load a frequently used document into MS Word. To add the document to your Work ... (view more)

Fri
17
Feb
Dennis Faas's picture

Create a Table of Contents in MS Word -- the EASY way!

Creating a Table of Contents ("TOC") for a Microsoft Word requires a lot of steps and can be really confusing. But it doesn't have to be difficult! In this tutorial, I'll explain how simple it is to create a TOC from any keyword or phrase in your ... document. Note: Your document does not need to have formatted Headings in order for Microsoft Word's Table of Contents feature to work. Word can build a TOC from any phrase or keyword in your document. For example, you might place a subject heading, keyword(s) or italicized phrase before each paragraph in your document and would like to use ... (view more)

Wed
25
Jan
Dennis Faas's picture

Picking up Where you Left Off: MS Word

If you open a document you were editing when you last used Word, you can use the Shift + F5 keyboard combination to quickly jump to where you were last working in the document. This is also a good way to get back to what you were editing after ... browsing through a document. You should remember an important caveat when trying to apply this tip: The Shift + F5 shortcut takes you back to where you made your last edit, not to where you last had the insertion point. For instance, if you are halfway through your document and you type a word or change a character that counts as an edit. Suppose that ... (view more)

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