researchers

Mon
20
Sep
Dennis Faas's picture

Video Games Make for Better Decision-Making: Report

Can playing video games make you smarter? While there may not be oodles of benefits for those who spend hours in front of the television regularly, a new study suggests gaming may actually help to improve the way we process information. According to ... researchers at the University of Rochester, video gamers are very good at probabilistic inference, which in layman's terms simply means that they're better at making rapid, quality decisions based on evidence around them. In essence, educated researchers (many of whom may be gamers) found that gamers make for good researchers. (Source: cnet.com ... (view more)

Wed
04
Aug
Dennis Faas's picture

Microsoft Amends Policy on Reporting Security Flaws

Microsoft has changed the its guidelines for reporting security flaws. It's a move that could bring Adobe into an industry-wide collaboration to share information about security risks. From now on, Microsoft will no longer urge security researchers ... to follow a "responsible disclosure" policy, in which it asked those who discovered flaws to keep them completely under wraps until a full fix had been found, tested and readied for distribution. Many security experts have claimed such a policy delayed Microsoft's response to security threats. They also felt not being able to talk about bugs made ... (view more)

Tue
27
Jul
Dennis Faas's picture

Mozilla, Google Pay Top Dollar for White Hat Hackers

Mozilla and Google have taken an interesting approach to ensuring that flaws, bugs and other problems associated with their Internet browsers are reported on in a timely manner. The two companies are paying outside researchers as added motivation, ... with the belief being that if a bonus is attached for their efforts, more individuals will be willing to offer up their time to discover new errors. Not All Researchers Financially Motivated Microsoft employees need not get too excited with the news, as company representatives announced that no such bonuses will be given to their researchers. ... (view more)

Mon
12
Jul
Dennis Faas's picture

Twitter 'Honeypots' Lure 30,867 Spammers

With thousands of people flocking to social networking sites each day, a campaign to reduce the ever-increasing spam attacks on Twitter should come as little surprise. What is unusual, however, is where funding for the research needed to crack down ... on Twitter spammers is coming from: Google. Google is offering a grant to researchers at Texas A ... (view more)

Thu
01
Apr
Dennis Faas's picture

Hackers Use Network Card Firmware to Deliver Payload

Cybercrime is often likened to a never-ending cycle: just when a security company believes they have found a way to combat one malware-installation method, hackers come along and find a new ways to attack a computer. Thus, it should come as little ... surprise that there is a new hack that attacks network card firmware: software specifically designed to control the network card. This innovative hacking technique (dubbed the "Jedi Packet Trick") works by sending infectious network packets to the network's firewall , which needs to be running a vulnerable network card. Once an infected packet is ... (view more)

Fri
24
Jul
Dennis Faas's picture

Researchers: Power Sockets can Detect Keyboard Input

Researchers at security firm Inverse Path plan to demonstrate how standard power sockets (used in a home, for instance) can be used to eavesdrop on what is being typed onto a computer keyboard. They plan to make a presentation at the Black Hat ... Security conference taking place in Las Vegas from July 25-30 this year. The researchers found that poor electrical shielding on some keyboard cables can result in data being leaked into power circuits. Analyzing such information allowed the researchers to see what was being typed on a keyboard. So far, demonstrations of the attacks have worked at ... (view more)

Wed
08
Jul
Dennis Faas's picture

Online Fraud Easier Due to Social Security Flaw

Researchers have discovered that it's easier to predict social security numbers than previously realized. The discovery means giving away too many personal details online is even more dangerous. A report by Carnegie Mellon University, published in ... The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, says that social security numbers were never intended to be used as a way of confirming somebody's identity. Instead they were meant purely as a way of keeping track of an individual's tax and benefit payments. The researchers were investigating a theory that there was a distinct pattern to the ... (view more)

Thu
23
Apr
Dennis Faas's picture

Windows Smartphone Used As Med Probe, Military Use

Researchers have developed a system that adapts a Windows-based smartphone to act as an ultrasound scanner. The device could be revolutionary in developing nations and might also have military uses. The system is based on existing portable ... ultrasound wands, which scan using soundwaves to produce an image of the inside of a body. The technique is best known for scanning images of fetuses, but has a wide range of medical uses. The problem with the existing system is that the wands then had to be plugged into an Internet-connected computer via a USB cable in order to share the results instantly ... (view more)

Fri
09
Jan
Dennis Faas's picture

SSL Websites Not Secure Enough, say Researchers

Pretty much anyone with a basic knowledge of web security knows to look for the padlock symbol and an address beginning 'https:' before typing in personal or confidential details. But security researchers say the system behind this safeguard may not ... be as secure as believed. You shouldn't panic immediately, however: the workaround was found by legitimate researchers and the full details are being kept secret for obvious reasons. It would also take both intensive computer power and some other hacking tricks for criminals to exploit the loophole. At the moment, the security gap is more of a ... (view more)

Tue
16
Dec
Dennis Faas's picture

Internet Security Is Losing The Online War

Despite the efforts of the computer security industry, malicious software is reportedly spreading faster than ever and security researchers have acknowledged that they cannot seem to get ahead of the onslaught. Internet security is broken and it ... appears that nobody knows quite how to fix it. This so-called malware surreptitiously takes over a PC then uses it to spread more malware to other machines exponentially. (Source: informationweek.com ) A conservative estimate by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe says that as more businesses and people move onto the Web, criminals ... (view more)

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