word

Wed
31
May
Dennis Faas's picture

Insert Page Breaks: MS Word

As documents grow longer and extend past one page, MS Word automatically calculates how much room is available and starts a new page when needed (keeping widows, orphans, and other text flow options in mind). MS Word also allows you to specify where ... to begin a new page by inserting a hard page break where you want one. Sometimes you only need a short page, such as a cover page, or perhaps you want to start a new part of the text on a new page. You wouldn't want to have to press Enter repeatedly, just to force Word to insert a page break. Instead, you want to control where page breaks occur. ... (view more)

Wed
03
May
Dennis Faas's picture

Print Delivery Point Barcodes on Envelopes: MS Word

Many people utilize the Envelopes and Labels feature of MS Word to create their own envelopes. One of the most often overlooked features of this tool, however, is Word’s ability to print delivery point bar codes on your envelopes. The delivery point b ...arcode is used by the sorting machines at the United States Postal Service to help route mail more efficiently. Depending upon what you’re mailing, you can save money on your postage by printing the delivery point barcode on an envelope. To learn more about saving money using this feature, you may visit the US Postal Service website ...ref="/news/1148/print-delivery-point-barcodes-envelopes-ms-word" class="more-link">view more)

Wed
12
Apr
Dennis Faas's picture

Chart Trends Effortlessly: MS Word

You don't have to be a spreadsheet wizard to create eye-catching "trend charts" in MS Word. If you can create a Word table, you can use Microsoft Graph Chart to create a visually appealing chart based on that table. First, you need a table with at ... least two rows. In the first row, enter descriptive labels for your data. In the rest of the rows, enter the data you want to chart. If you prefer, you can enter row-level text labels in the leftmost column of your table. If you do, the charting tool will ignore the first cell in the top-level corner of the table. Once you have a table, it takes ... (view more)

Tue
28
Mar
Dennis Faas's picture

Edit Your Own Custom Dictionary: MS Word

Recently, Dennis asked me: " I've just finished reading your previous article, ' Disable Custom Dictionary in MS Word ', and was wondering: how can I edit my own custom dictionary? I ask this because at one time I ran spell check on a document and ... accidentally added a misspelled word to my custom dictionary. I wanted to remove the misspelled word from the dictionary, but couldn't figure out how to do it. Can you suggest anything? " Carol's response: Absolutely! To remove words from your custom dictionaries: Launch MS Word. Go to Tools | Options | Spelling & Grammar; on the Tools ... (view more)

Fri
17
Mar
Dennis Faas's picture

Disable Custom Dictionary in MS Word

When the spell checker is activated in MS Word, text in your document are compared against the main dictionary and any additional "custom dictionaries" you may have created. Sometimes you may not want MS Word to use the custom dictionary. For ... instance, let's say that you have developed a rather extensive dictionary that is very specific to your industry or to your company. The dictionary may contain many specialized terms, but using those terms to spell-check a document you are preparing for may be inappropriate. If you want to limit Word's spell checker so it only uses the main dictionary, ... (view more)

Fri
17
Feb
Dennis Faas's picture

Create a Table of Contents in MS Word -- the EASY way!

Creating a Table of Contents ("TOC") for a Microsoft Word requires a lot of steps and can be really confusing. But it doesn't have to be difficult! In this tutorial, I'll explain how simple it is to create a TOC from any keyword or phrase in your ... document. Note: Your document does not need to have formatted Headings in order for Microsoft Word's Table of Contents feature to work. Word can build a TOC from any phrase or keyword in your document. For example, you might place a subject heading, keyword(s) or italicized phrase before each paragraph in your document and would like to use ... (view more)

Thu
02
Feb
Dennis Faas's picture

Fix Stubborn Formatting in MS Word

Have you ever tried to modify a block of text in MS Word that refuses to comply to your editing? Here's a really useful tip: you can 'start with a clean slate' by removing *all* formatting from the paragraph selection; simply select the block of ... text and press Ctrl-Shift-N to start fresh. Alternatively, you can use Word's Reveal Formatting task pane to modify the formatting. In Word 2003, hit Shift-F1; in Word 2002, select Reveal Formatting from the Format menu. When you click on an underlined link, an options dialog will display settings that you can modify. By checking the Distinguish style ... (view more)

Wed
25
Jan
Dennis Faas's picture

Insert a Non-breaking Space

When Microsoft Word calculates line width and wraps text to the next line, it tries to break the line at either a space or a hyphen. Sometimes, however, you may not want Word to break a line at a certain space. For instance, you may wish to make ... sure that two adjacent words appear on the same line. The answer is to use non-breaking spaces instead of regular ones. To do this, hold down the Ctrl and Shift keys as you press the Space Bar. Word then does not break the line at that point. Visit Carol's web site to learn more tips like this one! (view more)

Sun
22
Jan
Dennis Faas's picture

Speed up typing with AutoText

Do you often find yourself typing the same phrase over and over again? For example, let's say you work for the Wonderful World of Word Workaholics in Wonkaville. Just entering that name can become quite time-consuming. But you don't have to manually ... type the entire name each time you use it in a document. Instead, you can add it to Word's list of AutoText entries, and you'll never have to type the entire name again. Follow these steps: 1. Type the name of your organization as you normally would. 2. Select the text, and press [Alt+F3]. 3. Click OK in the Create AutoText dialog box. The next ... (view more)

Sat
21
Jan
Dennis Faas's picture

Print Keyboard Shortcuts

Did you ever wish there was a "quick key," "hot key," or shortcut for an everyday function that you use in Word? Well there are and you can print them out for handy reference! 1. In Word, select Tools | Macro | Macros or press Alt + F8. 2. In the ... Macros dialog box, select Word Commands from the "Macros in" drop-down list. 3. Select ListCommands from the "Macro name" list box. 4. Click Run. 5. Select Current menu and keyboard settings in the List Commands dialog box, and click OK. Word will create a document containing a table of commands and their keyboard shortcuts. Print it for future ... (view more)

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