Government

Tue
20
Nov
Dennis Faas's picture

After Being Slammed by Congress, Yahoo Settles

In North America, we certainly take for granted our freedom of speech. Although some libertarians argue that the battle to freely speak one's mind is still being waged, the situation here is clearly nothing like the restrictions of communist China, ... where the government and multimedia are still fighting for control of the public. The problem for many in the United States is not necessarily the policy of the Chinese government -- that's tough to change -- but the ethical standards of American companies operating in the country. Finally, there's a sign that the web's most powerful companies will ... (view more)

Tue
13
Nov
Dennis Faas's picture

Government Sour on Social Networking

Most visitors to Infopackets.com are computer and Internet aficionados. Our readers know the web, and seem to generally enjoy it. Chances are, most of you have dabbled in its social networking sphere, posting profiles to Facebook, MySpace, or one of ... the other, lesser-known sites. Now one poll is warning that this activity can backfire, and although it may not mean downloading a Trojan horse or other virus, it could perhaps offer something even more sinister: identity theft. (Source: bbc.co.uk ) Although few readers will be surprised by the crime, some may be shocked by the chances of it ... (view more)

Fri
09
Nov
Dennis Faas's picture

Russian Spyplanes to Provide Broadband?

An ambitious scheme could see Russian spy planes provide broadband Internet services. The scheme would use Myasishchev M-55 planes to plug gaps in Russia's patchy satellite coverage. They would also be used in areas where the telecoms system has ... been damaged or destroyed. Because the planes are designed to fly at high altitude, they can provide coverage to a much wider ground area. The planes, which are equivalent to the American U-2s, were originally designed to intercept US spy balloons. They've since been transferred to scientific uses such as studying the arctic stratosphere. An existing ... (view more)

Thu
18
Oct
Dennis Faas's picture

What's the Punishment for Leaking Vital Government Data?

Ever wonder what kind of punishment a government employee might receive for leaking the personal information of John Q. Public? Here's your answer in a nutshell: a week's vacation. The man who'll have less time this year to lounge on tropical ... beaches is one Jerry Miller, payroll team leader for the Ohio Department of Administrative Services. Miller is behind the agency's Administrative Knowledge System, or OAKS, and last month was found responsible for losing a tape containing data on nearly 65,000 state employees, 20,000 former state employees, and worst of all almost 50,000 Ohio taxpayers. ... (view more)

Thu
06
Sep
Dennis Faas's picture

The German Version of Big Brother

Ah, the modern wonders of 21st century technology. We live in a world where illegal wiretapping is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to violations of civil rights violations against U.S. citizens. Now, Germany reportedly wants to get ... involved in spying on citizens using tech, too. German officials want to use Trojan horse software to secretly monitor potential terror suspects' computing habits. German Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble is trying to include using Trojan horses as part of a broader security law being considered by the German government, alleging that judicial approval ... (view more)

Mon
20
Aug
Dennis Faas's picture

A High-Tech Big Brother Plan

In a couple recent articles by myself and my colleague Brandon Dimmel , we've mentioned the Big Brother concept a couple of times. Now we can talk about the worst Big Brother case scenario known to modern man (and woman). When used correctly, the ... concept of Big Brother can be beneficial to everyone's safety and security. When used as a tool to maintain complete control over an entire country, there is always the possibility of mind-numbing civil rights violations, too. At least 20,000 police surveillance cameras are reportedly being installed along streets in southern China. These will soon ... (view more)

Thu
26
Jul
Dennis Faas's picture

Does Windows Vista Send Information to the Government?

Is there more to Windows Vista being big brother than was originally thought? There appear to be features and services bundled into Windows Vista that stay in touch with the government and their associates, too. If this is true, Microsoft has gone ... too far. This post was in an abandonia.com forum, and appeared to get overloaded from all the attention it was getting. Whitedust.net had a copy of it on their site. A forum user switched to Windows Vista a month ago and actually had some good luck with it. He began noticing latency on his home network connection. He used port sniffing software and ... (view more)

Thu
28
Jun
Dennis Faas's picture

Could the U.S. Government Spy on You Via the BlackBerry?

The BlackBerry has been praised by some, rejected by others, and now banned by the Government of France, with the country's Minister of Defense calling the handheld device a "threat to French state secrets". What is most bizarre about the situation ... is that France has lashed out against the United States, claiming that American intelligence agencies are manipulating French BlackBerry devices to spy on government secrets. Emails that are sent from a French BlackBerry device must pass through servers in the United States and Britain. France fears that this process will make their systems prone ... (view more)

Mon
25
Jun
Dennis Faas's picture

AT&T's $10 DSL Plan

AT ... (view more)

Thu
12
Apr
Dennis Faas's picture

Big Brother is Watching: Talking Cameras invade Britain

British Homeland Security has put a new spin on video surveillance. By introducing CCTV cameras equipped with loudspeakers, security staff may now verbally berate those seen committing crimes. The cameras will have a two-way speaker system that ... allows staff to talk and respond directly to the perpetrator. The British government has high expectations for the talking cameras, because many believe that their presence will deter those considering breaking the law at the risk of public embarrassment. British Homeland Security forces have already reported a significant decline in crime rates in the ... (view more)

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