Facebook: Let Us Track You to Help Businesses

John Lister's picture

Facebook is to tell Apple users that it needs to track them to benefit businesses. It's a response to new Apple rules that mean users must opt-in to some forms of tracking.

The messages, currently being tested, will pop up when users access Facebook on an iPhone or iPad. According to copies seen by CNBC, it reads as follows:

Allow Facebook to use your app and website activity?

  • Get ads that are more personalized
     
  • Support businesses that rely on ads to reach customers

To provide a better ads experience, we need permission to use future activity that other apps and websites send us from this device. This won't give us access to new types of information.

Users will then see a link to learn more about how Facebook will limit its use of data activity if told to do so, followed by two buttons marked "Don't Allow" and "Allow". (Source: cnbc.com)

Apple Makes Tracking Opt-In

Perhaps unsurprisingly, this isn't a case of Facebook spontaneously becoming concerned about user consent. Instead, it's to do with a forthcoming iOS update that means users must opt in before they can be tracked by IDFA (ID for advertisers).

That's Apple's own system gives a device a random number and then tracks activity such as app use and clicking on ads. The idea is that advertisers can target an individual based on their precise behavior on the device, but without knowing who the individual is.

Facebook's idea appears to be to get its message on screen before one displayed by Apple itself, which will read:

"Facebook" would like permission to track you across apps and websites owned by other companies. This allows Facebook to provide you with a better ad experience."

It then offers a choice of "Ask App Not to Track" and "Allow Tracking."

Small Businesses "Need Help"

The two messages have some subtle but notable differences. Apple more explicitly explains that the tracking will include use of sites and apps other than Facebook.

Meanwhile, Facebook pushes support for businesses as a reason to allow tracking. That follows a previous newspaper ad where it said the new Apple rules could hurt small businesses that were struggling during the pandemic. (Source: arstechnica.com)

What's Your Opinion?

Is Facebook smart to get in first with the permission request? Is the argument about helping businesses persuasive to you as a device user? How much difference does it make if the ads you see are better targeted and theoretically more relevant?

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Comments

buzzallnight's picture

Is Facebook smart to get in first with the permission request?

It doesn't make any difference NO to all!!!!!!!!!

Is the argument about helping businesses persuasive to you as a device user?

NO!!!!!

How much difference does it make if the ads you see are better targeted and theoretically more relevant?

NONE!!!!!
I never buy anything from an ad or a phone call

That is actually what we need browser makers to do

allow us to set an

F off flag!

No matter what you want

F off!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

russoule's picture

While certainly NOT a civil method of saying "I don't want any ads!", buzz has a point. I also prefer to not be inundated with a lot of "advertising" while I am on the 'net. And I tend to dismiss those companies that DO such advertising, both while I am online as well as when I am in a store. The items I want I will look for, either online or in a retail shop and I really don't appreciate being bombarded with "BUY THIS!", "THE SALE IS ENDING IN AN HOUR!", "NEW AND IMPROVED!" amd more of that type of advertising. I get enough of that when watching the tv.

On the other hand, many people just cannot make a decision without an outside force telling them what is available.

So the "F off!!!!" button sounds like the best compromise. If you want to be subject to ads, turn it on and if you don't, turn it OFF.

buzzallnight's picture

Gmail wants you to change your browser to chrome
and you have to click no...

You are on a site that you have already registered on
and you go to the site from a link in their newsletter
and when you get to their site,
They ask you to register again....

You are on a free site or news letter that shows headlines
and when you click off on one of them
They want you to pay,
for stuff that you could find for free somewhere else....

Or they ask you to turn off your ad blocker...
you can get a virus through an ad...

Some sites use deceptive advertising to say they are
"Free"
and try to trick you
Like you go to a software downloading site
and there are a few fake "DOWN LOAD" buttons that look like they should be clicked but load different software than what you wanted...

So your F off software
would warn you about these problems as soon as possible
and auto click or auto delete
or take other actions to evade paying and substitute free sites.