How to Update rdpwrap.ini (RDP Wrapper)

Dennis Faas's picture

Infopackets Reader Tony G. writes:

" Dear Dennis,

Thanks for your previous article regarding RDP Wrapper, which allows me to connect to my media PC using more than one RDP (remote desktop protocol) session. This is incredibly convenient because the kids can be watching a movie on the media PC, I can still login to it through remote desktop without interrupting anything. The issue I'm having today is that Windows 10 recently updated to 10.0.17763.316, and now RDP Wrapper is broken. I have gone to the RDP Wrapper website and found other users complaining of the same problem. Many forum posts suggest I need to update the rdpwrap.ini file to make it work again. The problem is that I can't update the rdpwrap.ini file because I get 'access denied' or 'you do not have permission to open this file' when trying to save it using notepad. In other words, the file is in use. If I copy over top of the rdpwrap.ini (with another rdpwrap.ini file), I get the same issue - file is in use. The forum community doesn't seem to explain how to update RDP Wrapper step by step. Also, if I uninstall RDP Wrapper it reinstalls the default rdpwrap.ini file. I am going in circles and I have no idea how to update rdpwrap.ini. Can you help? "

My response:

RDP Wrapper is an amazing utility that 'wraps' over top of the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) found in MS Windows without actually patching any DLLs (termsrv.dll). It allows users to have more than 1 concurrent RDP session as commonly used with Windows Servers. If you are a power user that uses RDP to control a network of computers, RDP Wrapper is a godsend (depending on how you use it). Unfortunately, RDP Wrapper does not appear to be updated by the developer as of last year.

That said, there is a big community of users using RDP Wrapper. A small handful of them have developed their own fixes (also known as "offsets") to get around various Windows Update issues that break RDP Wrapper. The reason it breaks has to do with programming code updates to the dynamic link library (termsrv.dll) of the remote desktop protocol itself, courtesy of Microsoft. Unfortunately, finding the right fix (rdpwrap.ini offset) to make RDP Wrapper work again is not always easy to do because you often have to wait for a fix to be developed by the community, then wade through forum posts in search of said fix.

One place to look is the git repository provided by fre4kyC0de, as he seems to post update fixes to the rdpwrap.ini file as soon as they are available.

How to Update rdpwrap.ini (RDP Wrapper)

In order to update the rdpwrap.ini file, you first need to stop the RDP service, otherwise you will get an 'access denied' error or similar.

To do so:

  1. Click Start, then type in "cmd" (no quotes); wait for CMD.EXE or Command Prompt to appear in the list, then right click and "Run as administrator".
     
  2. A black command prompt window should now appear. Type in the following into the command prompt and press Enter to execute the command:

    net stop termservice
     
  3. Next, make sure you have the latest RDP Wrapper installed. At the time of this writing, version 1.6.2 is the latest release. Also worth mentioning: do not patch your termsrv.dll or the RDP Wrapper simply won't work, even if you update the rdpwrap.ini file. I'm mentioning this because some RDP Wrapper forum users provide third party patches to the termsrv.dll; however, using this in conjunction with the new offsets will break RDP Wrapper.
     
  4. Next, patch your configuration file located at C:\Program Files\RDP Wrapper\rdpwrap.ini.

    There are two ways to do this: either replace the entire rdpwrap.ini or patch (update) your existing one.

    a) to replace the entire rdpwrap.ini, you will need to find one provided by the community. As of April 15, 2019, this version of the rdpwrap.ini should work for Windows 10 Pro users up to Windows 10 17763.475 (at the time of this writing). In this case, download the .ZIP, extract it, then copy and paste the rdpwrap.ini over top of the one located in C:\Program Files\RDP Wrapper\rdpwrap.ini.

    b) to patch the rdpwrap.ini yourself, you can refer to the git repository provided by fre4kyC0de (for example), then search for his latest Windows 10 version (usually according to file date in the repository). I came across fre4kC0de's repository while stumbling through forum posts pertaining to the latest fixes. Once you have the right file, open C:\Program Files\RDP Wrapper\rdpwrap.ini using notepad and append his offsets at the end of your rdpwrap.ini file. In this case, 10.0.17134.706.txt corresponds to Windows 10 17763.475 (at the time of writing).
     
  5. Next, restart the term service (remote desktop protocol) using the command line:

    net start termservice
     
  6. Now, test that your RDP Wrapper service is configured properly. To do so: download the latest RDP Wrapper release in .ZIP format; extract the .ZIP, then run RDPConf.exe. At the time of this writing, RDP Wrapper version 1.6.2 (zip) is the latest version.

    When you run RDPConf.exe, the "Wrapper state" should be "Installed", the "Service state" should be "Running", the "Listener state" should be "Listening" and directly to the right of that it should say [fully supported]. All of these values should be in green. If you see anything in red, then something is not working properly. You can also then test to see if RDP Wrapper is working by running the "RDPCheck.exe" program which will attempt use Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) to connect to the same system @ 127.0.0.2. If you see a login screen then it is working.

I hope that helps. If you are still stuck, you can contact me for remote desktop support and I can look into this for you.

Additional 1-on-1 Support From Dennis

If all of this is over your head, or if you can't get RDP Wrapper working, I can help using my remote desktop support service. Simply contact me, briefly describing the issue and I will get back to you as soon as possible.

Got a Computer Question or Problem? Ask Dennis!

I need more questions. If you have a computer question - or even a computer problem that needs fixing - please email me with your question so that I can write more articles like this one. I can't promise I'll respond to all the messages I receive (depending on the volume), but I'll do my best.

About the author: Dennis Faas is the owner and operator of Infopackets.com. With over 30 years of computing experience, Dennis' areas of expertise are a broad range and include PC hardware, Microsoft Windows, Linux, network administration, and virtualization. Dennis holds a Bachelors degree in Computer Science (1999) and has authored 6 books on the topics of MS Windows and PC Security. If you like the advice you received on this page, please up-vote / Like this page and share it with friends. For technical support inquiries, Dennis can be reached via Live chat online this site using the Zopim Chat service (currently located at the bottom left of the screen); optionally, you can contact Dennis through the website contact form.

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